What exactly is Content Marketing?

In the last few months I have been asked many times the question: ok, but what exactly is content marketing? And it’s not just marketers. The question is coming in fact from non-marketers, colleagues, sales pros, even finance folks – just to mention a few. Friends and family included.

I try and answer using different examples; examples that match the area or the specific sector the person asking is familiar with: Amex and Sage for finance pros, GE and Capgemini for Engineers, IoT and Data centres experts,  Airbnb, Red Bull and Lego for friends, daughters and relatives.

But how to explain the difference between Content Marketing and Global Content Marketing? How to explain that what is working for a country doesn’t necessarily work for another, despite we live in a super-globalised world?Sometimes, I get lost.

And so here are two great posts. The first, from Newscred, defines what content marketing is. The second, from my good friend Pam Didner, explains global content marketing and clarifies what the implications of that world – global – are.

Next time someone will ask, I will point to this post.

How to use Psychology to improve Design and Content Marketing

Design and content are inextricably linked. Confusing, dated, or unappealing design can reduce your content’s effectiveness. On the other hand, strong design can facilitate more conversions and content consumption.

As a content marketer, I’ve helped global corporations optimize their blogs, newsletters, and content destinations. During those processes, I realized that I was going beyond the boundaries of content marketing and web design. I was touching a new, unknown domain: psychology.

How to make advantage of psychology principles to improve design and content marketing? Here is my new post on the topic, just published on NewsCred Insights blog. Also, I am starting to dissect the post, adding lots more details and creating a three-post series on psychology and content marketing. The first post of the series can be found here on ContentXBorders: How to apply psychology to design and content marketing and attract visitors’ attention.

Enjoy the reading.

Featured image by Scott Webb

Content Hub strategy overview for global enterprises

Michael Brenner once wrote:

A content hub is the home of your content marketing efforts. It’s where most of your content lives, and it’s where you drive users. For many brands, it’s their strongest owned channel.

So, why would your company need a content hub? Why a content hub should be at the hearth of your global content marketing strategy? This presentation deck introduces and defines the content hubs, clarifies main points and put the content hub strategy into contest. Also, provides examples and can be reused by all content marketers who are putting together a wider global content marketing strategy for their enterprises.

Content Marketing Across Borders opens the doors to guest bloggers and writers

After years of being a lonely and grumpy blogger I decided to invite guest bloggers to write on ContentMarketingAcrossBorders. The first three authors that have kindly created custom content – or gave permissions to share existing content – for CMXB are Molly Clarke,  Maël Roth and Pam Didner.

CMXB is now open to all Global Content Marketing experts willing to share strategy and best practices with a global audience via this dedicated channel. Thank you!

What’s the Simplest Definition of Global Content Marketing?

Global Content Marketing

Original post has been published by Pam Didner. Pam is a Global Content Marketing Strategist and Author and this is her blog.

Content marketing is using content as a way to communicate the benefits of your products and services.

Although my teenage sons thought it was pretty cool that I published a book, Global Content Marketing, they only vaguely know that it’s a marketing book. They didn’t bother to find out until recently what it is really about when one of them finally asked me: “What exactly is [global] content marketing, mom?”

Rather than giving them a formal definition, I asked him what he usually does when he is interested in purchasing a product or a service.  He told me that he would search the name of the products, research on the Internet, read product reviews and talk to his friends. I told him the information comes up when he does his research is called content. “In the web industry, anything that conveys meaningful information to humans is called content.” (Erin Kissane). It’s as simple as that!

Continue reading “What’s the Simplest Definition of Global Content Marketing?”

Global Content Marketing and Localisation: 3 Business Strategy Frameworks

Global Content Marketing Strategy

Original post has been published here by Maël Roth. Maël is a Global Content Marketing Strategist and this is his blog.

Going global with content marketing sounds easy (just translate it, right?) but it actually takes a lot more preparation than you might expect. In this post, we’ll have a look at three frameworks with which you’ll be better prepared if you want to conquer a foreign market with your content. Continue reading “Global Content Marketing and Localisation: 3 Business Strategy Frameworks”

The Global Marketer’s Guide to User-Generated Content

Modern buyers are more educated and connected than ever before—making it increasingly difficult for marketers to capture their attention. As such, the traditional content marketing strategies of the past just won’t cut it anymore. So, what’s a marketer to do? Enter user-generated content.

User-generated content—or UGC—is exactly what it sounds like: content created by users. For brands, users are people who interact with your brand or products in some capacity but aren’t professionally affiliated with your company.

The difference between UGC and more traditional marketing tactics is that UGC relies on your customers to promote your brand, rather than doing it yourself.

Why Are Global Marketers Turning to User-Generated Content?

For global marketers it’s difficult to find one type of content that performs across all demographics, locations, and markets. This is largely due to the fact that each audience has a different set of buying habits, pain points, motivators, and other contributing factors.

The beauty of UGC is that it’s created by the customer for the customer. It naturally transcends the barriers that stand in the way of traditional content types—think language, cultural differences, and more.   Consider these statistics:

  • 41% of consumers only need to see between 1 and 4 pieces of UGC to be influenced to purchase (source) whereas 47% of consumers need to see 3 to 5 pieces of traditional content to even speak with a sales rep (source).
  • UGC is 35% more memorable than any other media and 50% more trusted (source).
  • UGC results in 29% higher web conversions than campaigns or websites without it (source).

Looking for more reasons to jump on the UGC bandwagon? Keep reading.

Continue reading “The Global Marketer’s Guide to User-Generated Content”

The Sexiest Job of the Century: Data Science and the Rise of “Hybrid Marketing”

It was five years ago, exactly, in October 2012, when Harvard Business Review (HBR) declared “data scientist” to be the sexiest job of the century. HBR told the stories of Jonathan Goldman and D.J. Patil from LinkedIn, and Jeff Hammerbacher from Facebook, among others. They were the ones who coined the original term “data scientist” back in 2008 while they were leading data and analytics at their respective companies. The appearance of data scientists on the business scene reflects the fact that enterprises are now dealing with information that comes in varieties and volumes never seen before – what we usually call “Big Data.”

Data scientist is the sexiest job of the century

Also in 2012, the research company Gartner suggested that there will be 4.4 million “big data jobs” in the coming years, and that only a third of them will be successfully filled. That projection should not have been surprising. Everything is moving toward data at the speed of light: big data, mobile data, performance data, content data, product data, and even data about how we measure our data.

Continue reading “The Sexiest Job of the Century: Data Science and the Rise of “Hybrid Marketing””

How to Use Global Content Marketing Tactics for Internal Communications (via NewsCred Insight)

Internal Communications

When we talk about content marketing, we share tips and advice on strategy, audience building, distribution, and ROI. We discuss the content we create and who we are targeting, but we rarely do so in the context of internal communications.

Whether we work for a large enterprise or a small start-up, internal communication is a critical function. Especially for companies running global content marketing programs, it’s critical to establish internal communication channels between teams. This will ensure that everyone knows the latest information about content processes, frameworks, methodologies, and best practices.

One solution: use content marketing tactics internally. Email newsletters, content hubs, and apps are all great ways to solve internal communications challenges and keep employees and partners aligned.

My new full post, via NewsCred’s Insights.

Featured image by Annie Spratt

How to find the Optimal Balance Between Central and Local Content Teams

This post has originally been published on NewsCred’s Insights content hub. This is my original version. It includes content and references that had to  be removed from the company’s blog. 

One of the most critical aspects of going global with a content marketing strategy in a large and complex enterprise is finding the right balance between central and local organisations. In fact, just deploying a content marketing model across multiple regions – even if it has been tested successfully in one country – will simply not work. You need to plan, find the right global to local balance, pilot and then scale at global level. In most regions, like Asia or Europe for example – with dozens of different countries and languages, – it is unrealistic to make content work for each individual market. Continue reading “How to find the Optimal Balance Between Central and Local Content Teams”